• Eye Camp | October 27, 2012

    Many heartfelt thanks to Harjinder Sandhu and Family for their generousity, support, and funding for the eyecamp that took place on October 27, 2012!!

  • "...age related cataract is responsible for 48% of world blindness which represents 18 million people" - World Health Organization

Our Mission Statement

"To eliminate curable blindness by providing free access to preventative examinations and surgical care for impoverished people living in Punjab, India."

Read Their Stories

Dhata Foundation Eyecamp | November 12, 2006

Patient Name: Chahari | Age 65

When Chahari was examined at the eye camp it was learned that not only did she have mature cataracts in both eyes but she was also rapidly losing her hearing. Accompanied by her granddaughter Nuthan, at all times (they slept in the same bed together), we also learned that Chahari had been blind for some time and had never been able to see a doctor about her vision as she could not afford it. Chahari had a successful lens replacement in her left eye and we hope she will come back to a camp in the future to receive a second lens replacement in her right eye to fully regain her vision.

Chahari Chahari
Chahari with her granddaughter Nuthan in their sleeping quarters. Doctor Solomon examining Chahari’s eye two days after her surgery.
Patient Name: Munisha | Age - 13 months

Father’s Name: Sanjeev
Mother’s Name: Manjinder

When Munisha’s parents first brought her to the eye camp and she was examined by doctors it was discovered that Munisha had cataracts in both of her eyes. The cataracts had progressed to a point where the 13 month child could no longer see (Picture 1). She was also diagnosed with having a squint as well as wandering eye syndrome. Upon the doctor’s examination it was determined that Munisha was likely born with cataracts. Munisha’s parents left with her after learning the surgeries could not be performed at the camp due to the lack of the correct lenses; however, they were tracked down before they left the vicinity and were told that the child would receive the proper care. The surgeries could not be performed at the eye camp so Munisha, accompanied by her parents, was sent to Ruby Memorial Hospital via a chartered bus with fellow patients. We are proud to say that, within one month, lens replacement surgeries had been performed on both her eyes and her squint was corrected.

Munisha Munisha
Munisha Munisha following her first surgery.
(Left to right: Avtar Dhat, Sanjeev, Manjinder, Munisha & Surinder Dhat.)
Patient Name: Amarjit Kaur | Age 60

Upon examination it was determined that Amarjit had been completely blind for 5 years. Due to the fully matured cataracts the vision was blocked in both of her eyes. Amarjit did not have the money to have her vision examined, let alone treated. Amarjit had a lens replacement in her right eye. After her bandage was removed two days following the surgery she let out a cry "Thank God, I can see!" Her heightened emotion brought tears to the volunteers surrounding her.


Amarjit Kaur
Amarjit two days after her surgery.

Patient Name: Kalwant Kaur | Age 45

When Kalwant came to the eye camp it was learned that not only did she have mature cataracts but she had been in a wheel chair for nine years following a horrific accident while transporting some feed for farm animals in the rain. Accompanied by her daughter in law, we were told that Kalwant had never seen an eye doctor and was accepting her progression to blindness as a fact of life. Kalwant had a lens replacement done and has complete vision in one eye. We hope she will return to a camp in the future to receive a second lens replacement in her other eye to fully regain her vision.

Kalwant Kaur Kalwant Kaur
Kalwant Kaur Doctor Solomon inspecting Kalwant's eye two days after her surgery.
Patient Name: Raj Khumar | Age 10

Father: Narinder Singh

Raj Kumar arrived at the eye camp two days after the surgery date; he instantly touched all of the volunteers' hearts with his warm smile. Sadly it was discovered that Raj Kumar was going blind and his father Narinder was already blind. Further examination revealed that Narinder's father also went blind at an early age and that two of Narinder's brothers were also blind. With the little money they had they had Raj Kumar's vision examined; the doctor said his vision would be fine and that his vision loss would eventually go away. The doctors, working with the DHATA Foundation, determined they would be unable to treat Raj Kumar's progressive eye loss as it was a result of a genetic disorder and irreversible. At the time of the camp we had found a school for the blind so Raj Kumar would be able to learn how to live an independent life. We will try following up with Raj Kumar in the coming years in hopes that he is attending the school; if he is not, we will encourage his parents to send him.


Raj Kumar
Raj Kumar and his Father Narinder.

Patient Name: Harnak Singh | Age 26

Upon examining Harnak it was determined that he had lost vision in one eye due to an accident. He had poor vision in the other eye forcing him to quit his job as a taxi driver. He was the sole financial support for his family; his family was suffering greatly from his disability. He not only supported his wife, child, mother and father but, due to circumstances out of his control, was left supporting his brother as well. The poor vision in his eye was due to a mature development of a cataract. His lens replacement surgery could not be performed at the camp due to the availability of the required lens. After tracking down the correct lens, Harnak was sent to Ruby Memorial Hospital to have surgery. After a successful surgery his vision in his one eye has completely been restored and he is able to once again begin working to support his family.

Harnak Singh Harnak Singh
Harnak two days after his surgery. Harnak with Surinder and Avtar Dhat.

About Us

At the Dhata Foundation our goal is to eliminate curable blindness by providing free access to preventative examinations and surgical care for impoverished people living in Punjab, India. We aspire to work with organizations and individuals that seek to accomplish similar goals. With such working relationships we believe that, together, we can make a positive difference in the lives of those in need. We will attempt to help as many people as we can regardless of age, creed, race, religion, sex or sexual orientation.

Developed by Manju Dhat